Hollywood Dreams Announces Nominees

hollywood dreamz
Photo courtesy of Hollywood Dreams Film Festival

I am very honored that Seeking Valentina, a short film which I produced with Armin Nasseri, has garnered two nominations at this year’s Hollywood Dreams International Film Festival, including BEST SHORT & BEST VISUAL EFFECTS. ¬†Our film screens later this week, in Las Vegas. ¬†Want to catch it in Vegas? ¬†See here.

Hollywood Dreams calls itself,

“A blend of new classic world film, hospitality, industry connections and of course a hearty brand of distributors, buyers, audience and special guests will round out what is sure to become a major stop in the vein of top U.S. and international film events.”

¬†¬†For a full list of nominees for this year’s Hollywood Dreams International Film Festival, click here. ¬†Congratulations to our cast and crew, whose talents and efforts continue to receive world-wide acclaim and many thanks to Del Weston and Theresa Weston, the founders of Hollywood Dreams Film Festival.

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Penny Wise Pound Foolish

Peruse this article from the Austin Business Journal on the debate on film incentives in the state of Texas.

If you’ve ever done a professional film budget, the often invisible costs of making a movie are massive: ¬†permits, feeding ¬†people, putting cast and crew up in hotels, renting vehicles, supplies, location fees. ¬†A film of any scale involves a massive infrastructure, often localized, to support it. ¬†The last budget I prepped, I had to price out renting a local herd of goats, feeding said goats and the cost of a local wrangler and stable fees. ¬†It’s this detail and minutiae that really make the cost of film what it is–and profitable for locals that can cash in on it.

I really want to film in Texas. ¬†Why? ¬†It’s my home state. ¬†It’s where many of my stories are. ¬†It’s what I know. ¬†I probably won’t. ¬†Texas’ neighbors have better incentives. ¬†I want to do something for my community and filming could bring massive influxes of money to a very economically vulnerable area.

When I was asked at the San Antonio Film Festival why I hadn’t spent more time filming in my home state, I said at the time that, “It was not where my opportunities were, where my education led me.” ¬†I keep returning to that question. ¬†Here’s another reason why, one I couldn’t quite articulate in the moment:

The state doesn’t commit to its film community. ¬†

Why should I commit to spend potentially millions of dollars in the state?

Movies aren’t made overnight. ¬†They are long-haul projects. ¬†It may take a screenwriter a year to get a camera-ready draft. ¬†It may take us a year or more to get funded. ¬†It may take us several months of pre-production, which will likely involve traveling back and forth. ¬†We try to hire locally qualified people for the crew. ¬†We will be in your state 30-60 days just filming, 12 hour days and paying for food and hotels and ancillary services, like dry cleaning, local assistants, etc. ¬†We may be in your state several months after that if there’s a great post-house. ¬†We may spend money on a Texas premiere if it’s a Texas subject.

The stability of state’s commitment to arts funding matters. ¬†It’s a risk management consideration. ¬†If you’re always threatening to pull a plug on your incentives, it’s not enticing.

 The counter-argument is that film jobs are temporary jobs and that is true to a point, but if you invest in creating a community, the jobs will keep coming.  Just ask Atlanta.  It seems there are some in government that would much rather have its denizens chained to an overabundance of low-paying retail jobs than branching out into a more highly skilled, better paid, film position.

I think it’s very shortsighted of the Texas legislature to nix film funding. ¬†You could film almost anything in Texas, such is the geological and architectural diversity. ¬†This is a whole state issue, not just an Austin or Dallas concern, where much of the film making takes place. ¬†There are many areas that could benefit from more filming. ¬†And frankly, it’s unnerving when New Mexico is standing in as Texas on film. ¬†It’s happening more and more often.

¬†There’s a poster on the wall at the UTLA Center, an older poster, red, of all the great films made in Texas, which was a promo poster done by the Texas Film Commission a few years ago. ¬†I hope they have to update that poster soon, with new, great films being made in Texas, but ¬†the legislature must seize the opportunity.

Why I Support Student Filmmakers

Today, I had the privilege of emailing back and forth Dr. Diane Dusick of the Inland Empire Media Academy, regarding their upcoming film festival. ¬†This year will be the third year in a row that I’ve been a judge of their student film festival.

IEMA 2017

I think student films are vitally important to the future of film making, perhaps not the individual films themselves, but the validation that young cinematic voices need to thrive in the very competitive film industry. ¬†How many times have I hears someone say, “It’s just a student film?” ¬†Often.

“It’s just a student film” negates the fact that the student has chosen a career path in film.

“It’s just a student film” negates the artistic voice of the student, even if that voice is still trying to find itself.

“It’s just a student film” lowers our expectations and does not explore the struggle all film students have in making their first works.

It’s a battle to make a film, even for a pro, even for someone who’s made hundreds. ¬†How do we create pros? ¬†How do we foster professionalism in filmmaking? ¬†Though schools, through mentoring, through sharing.

This is why I support student film.

Confessions of a Film Festival Juror

There are thousands of film festivals and thousands of short films. ¬†I have ¬†judged film competitions in the past and recently had ‚Äújury duty‚ÄĚ for a film festival. ¬†Much of film festival submissions and judging is conducted electronically these days. ¬†I want to give you a very human perspective on what goes on when someone is watching your film. ¬†I am just one person. ¬†All festivals and festival judges are different, but I hope this helps the filmmakers out there have a little perspective.

Read more on Mogul.